The Power of Anonymity

The Power of Anonymity

I have a daughter graduating from high school this month. Her class is heading for a mission trip to serve an orphanage in the Dominican Republic for a week. For her to go on this trip, she had to raise her own support of $1,500, or pay for it out of her savings. Honestly, I was hoping that she could raise half of the money, and then we’d kick in the other half. So, she started her own GoFundMe campaign, and to my utter shock, in the first day she hit her fundraising goal. Apparently, there were a couple of anonymous donors who made some big gifts. I don’t know who these people are, but I am grateful to them. And because I don’t know who these people are (they might even be reading this blog) I am motivated to be grateful to everyone I talk to. Because, I just don’t know. That got me thinking. In my line of work, we go to great lengths to segment donors based on their past or potential giving. And while I have oodles of data that show this is an effective utilitarian approach, I wonder if this approach does cause us to curtail our gratitude? I take these kinds of questions seriously. It’s one of the reasons I love fundraising. We are always struggling to optimize fundraising with a balance of art and science. And while we at Analytical Ones always think your decision should be anchored in the data, they must also be anchored in...
More is Not Always More

More is Not Always More

As we Atlanta Falcons fans know, just because you’re ahead at halftime doesn’t mean that you’re going to win. More is not always more. We all know that Acquisition Strategy is important for donor long-term value and for a non-profit’s long-term income, but HOW important? I recently did some analysis for a non-profit, and the numbers were striking – especially when looking at the donor’s initial gift size and the subsequent LTV. Due to a change in Acquisition Strategy, the new donor average gift jumped 48% from $46 to $68 between FY14 and FY15. And the projected 5-year LTV for the FY15 new donors jumped 49% over the LTV for the FY14 new donors, from $159 to $237. Not surprisingly, with the new acquisition strategy, the client had a decrease in number of new donors. But, with a 10% decrease in number of new donors, there is still a significant increase in revenue over 5 years: 5,000 new donors X $159 LTV = $795,000 4,500 new donors X $237 LTV = $1,066,500 If you factor in cultivation costs at an average of $7/year per donor (and the savings from not mailing the 500 donors NOT acquired) that’s a net increase of $289,000 over 5 years. If you continue this same acquisition strategy for 5 years, that’s a net increase of $1,445,000 for those new donors. So, all told, acquiring more valuable donors to start with makes a big difference down the...