A Question to my P2P Peeps

A Question to my P2P Peeps

Not surprisingly, one of our favorite quotes at Analytical Ones is from Peter Drucker: “If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.” Most people in direct response fundraising agree. Perhaps that’s why the fundraising field is filled with metric hungry professionals – everyone wants to learn how to improve their programs and raise more money. Really, this drive for improving fundraising performance is why we are in business. But there is one fundraising category that seems not to be as metric hungry. And those are our friends who manage Peer-to-Peer fundraising events. While I have some hypotheses, I’m not exactly sure why this is the case. So, if you work in the P2P space, I’d love for you to review my hypotheses and tell me if these are all wrong. And, if they are, share your thoughts to explain this phenomenon. Hypothesis #1: Boards of Directors view P2P events as more about building the brand of the nonprofit and less about fundraising – so the focus is on executing a memorable event rather than a profitable event. Hypothesis #2: P2P events demand so many long hours of preparation that once it’s done, the staff really don’t have time to evaluate it. The focus is on starting preparation for the next event. Hypothesis #3: By nature, P2P staff are more qualitative than quantitative. They aren’t driven by the numbers like their direct response fundraiser counterparts. Hypothesis #4: P2P events just don’t budget for analytics – so they never can afford them. Ok P2P people, tell me I’m...
Pledge Conversion Recommendation

Pledge Conversion Recommendation

Here’s a crazy out of the box idea. We all know the power of the donor who gives month in and month out. This idea will both save you money in the long run and could possibly generate a lot of monthly revenue for your organization. But it is also a bit risky. Particularly if you are still only comfortable with traditional direct response. Start with the donor segment of 60+ months lapsed with 3+ gifts. These are donors who have showed commitment in the past but haven’t given you anything in five years. Send them a request to re-join your cause with a monthly EFT gift. Have four super easy gift ask handles: $2 per month $4 per month $5 per month $10 per month Now here’s the risky part. On the outer envelope put some teaser copy in effect to: “This is the last time we will ask you for a gift. Ever.” In the letter, thank them for their past support and affirm that you are still doing work worthy of support. Recognize that it’s been a while since you’ve received a gift and that there are several reasons why people let their membership lapse. Write that this option would hopefully be easier for the donor’s time, energy, and budget while also being beneficial for the organization. And then you can never mail them again. Ever. Realistically, any response you receive is more than you’ve received from them in the past 5-years anyway. If it works well, try your 48-59 months lapsed donors...