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Analytical Ones uses market research and data analytics to help nonprofits

win new donors, lift the performance of current donors and keep active donors longer

Whether you’re a nonprofit or an agency serving nonprofits Analytical Ones can enhance your market research and analytics capabilities with the following services:

Data Analytics

A deep dive into your donor data to find areas of opportunity and predict your future fundraising performance

Donor Segmentation

Donor and prospect segmentation, plan building, file scoring and strategy for smart cultivation.

Market Research

Focus groups, in-depth interviews and online surveys to gain insights from your current and prospective donors

One-on-One Consultation

We don’t simply provide reports, we provide expert strategy to improve your fundraising
Guid to Fundraising Metrics
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Latest From The Blog:

Let’s Chat about Lift

Here at analytical ones we have identified three key ways to grow revenue: Win more donorsLift the performance of the donors you already haveKeep more of the donors you already have We talk a lot about winning, acquisition and reactivation, but we don’t often talk about lifting, increasing the value of donors already on the file. So, let’s talk about it! In some recent analyses I explored what impacted donor upgrades and downgrades for donors of various values. The analysis was limited to donors who had given in both fiscal years. My primary question: how do year over year changes in average gift and gift frequency differ for higher and lower value donors? What I found was quite interesting.  For higher value donors, an increase in gift amount was the most significant contributor to upgrades. For lower value donors, while average gift did tend to increase, an increase in gift frequency was more significant to their upgrade. The same was true, conversely, for downgrading donors. Decreased gift amount was more closely related to downgrading high value donors than it was for lower value donors. This may mean that, to prevent downgrades, getting a donor to give an additional gift in a given year may either 1) Prevent them from downgrading or 2) Lead to a donor upgrading in value. How might we offer donors of higher and lower values sufficient opportunities to upgrade? How might we combat declining gift frequency to decrease downgrade percentages? Come back next week, I have a few ideas to...

My Fall In-Box

I don’t know about you, but I received far fewer direct mail appeals this fall (between October 1st and December 31st.) Last year, I received an even 50 direct mail appeals. This year, I received only 30. That’s a 40% decrease in volume, which is significant. During the last week of the year, I received 99 e-mail appeals (this is the first year I have tracked this metric). Half of those came on the final two days of the year. Here is a recap of the direct mail I received this year, and the insights I noted: Of the 30 pieces of direct mail, 15 mailings were appeals from 8 organizations I have previously supported, while 15 pieces were new donor acquisition kits from 11 organizations. Once again, I received the most pieces from The Salvation Army (7) – though four of the mailings were duplicates. I have supported The Army in two different Divisions, both of which sent me identical appeals. I contacted one Division about this issue last year, but the message must not have reached the right people. World Vision and World Wild Life Found sent me the two catalogs I received I did not receive any newsletters.For acquisition, I received three premium packages. One was from St. Jude with address labels and a notepad, and I received two handbags from Doctors Without Borders. My team and I are looking forward to analyzing all the end of year data these fall appeals have generated. We’re looking forward to seeing your data,...

A Cautionary Tale of Stopping New Donor Acquisition

As I’ve shared before, one of our most common analyses, sadly, is projecting what happens to a donor file’s active counts if an organization decides to discontinue new donor acquisition – after all, new donor acquisition is just too expensive. Well, today’s graph is not a projection . . . but a real-life example of what happens to donor file when an organization stops acquiring new donors for just two years. Figure 1: Active Donor Counts Not sure I need to say anything else. What a total unmitigated disaster. In just two years of not acquiring new donors, this organization’s active donor counts were cut in half. This organization now faces the dim prospect of having to invest more in new donor acquisition over the next several years just to get back to where they were in FY17. So unnecessary. If you (or your client) is considering such a decision, please, please, show them this...